Dentist - Woodbridge / Perth Amboy
424 Amboy Ave.
Woodbridge, NJ 07095
Tel: 732-442-0037 or 732-636-3434

Call Today 732-442-0037
Or 732-636-3434

424 Amboy Ave.
Woodbridge, NJ 07095

Archive:

Smile Gallery Woodbridge

f m b t

Posts for: August, 2018

By Convery Dental Associates
August 29, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
GetaLookatYourFutureMakeoverLookNowwithaTrialSmile

You've reached a decision—that old, unattractive smile has to go. You're ready for a complete makeover—and the field of cosmetic dentistry has the materials, techniques and equipment to make it happen.

But it could be a major undertaking requiring a fair amount of time and money. And once all the procedures are complete, what if you're not happy with the results?

Fortunately, you don't have to wait with nervous apprehension until the end of the dental work to see what your smile will look like. We can give you a realistic preview of your new smile before we even begin—and not on a computer monitor. We can actually create a trial smile applied directly to your actual teeth so you can see your new look up close and personal, and in all three spatial dimensions.

That's not to put down enhanced computer presentations. State-of-the-art imaging software can display an accurate representation of your future smile transposed onto an image of your face. But it's still a two-dimensional image, like any other photograph. It can't present the full range, movement or feel of the real thing.

A trial smile can. We shape and sculpt composite resin to resemble the finished dental work and temporarily bond it to your teeth. Once applied, you'll then be able to see what your appearance will look like from different angles and movements. Although we'll have to remove the trial smile before you leave, we can photograph it so you can show it to family and friends for their reaction.

While it's an added expense, a trial smile has two great benefits. First, it helps both of us "test drive" your new look and see how it performs in different ways: as you speak, when you're relaxed and, of course, when you smile. This allows us, if necessary, to fine-tune your planned dental work. Perhaps the biggest benefit, though, is that it can reassure you you've made the right decision to remake your smile. 

With a trail smile, there are no surprises—you'll know what the end result will look like before any work is done. And that can be a great motivator toward obtaining the smile you've dreamed of having.

If you would like more information on restoring your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Testing Your Smile Makeover: The Reassurance of a Trial Smile.”


By Convery Dental Associates
August 19, 2018
Category: Oral Health
DrTravisStorkDontIgnoreBleedingGums

Are bleeding gums something you should be concerned about? Dear Doctor magazine recently posed that question to Dr. Travis Stork, an emergency room physician and host of the syndicated TV show The Doctors. He answered with two questions of his own: “If you started bleeding from your eyeball, would you seek medical attention?” Needless to say, most everyone would. “So,” he asked, “why is it that when we bleed all the time when we floss that we think it’s no big deal?” As it turns out, that’s an excellent question — and one that’s often misunderstood.

First of all, let’s clarify what we mean by “bleeding all the time.” As many as 90 percent of people occasionally experience bleeding gums when they clean their teeth — particularly if they don’t do it often, or are just starting a flossing routine. But if your gums bleed regularly when you brush or floss, it almost certainly means there’s a problem. Many think bleeding gums is a sign they are brushing too hard; this is possible, but unlikely. It’s much more probable that irritated and bleeding gums are a sign of periodontal (gum) disease.

How common is this malady? According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, nearly half of all  Americans over age 30 have mild, moderate or severe gum disease — and that number increases to 70.1 percent for those over 65! Periodontal disease can occur when a bacteria-rich biofilm in the mouth (also called plaque) is allowed to build up on tooth and gum surfaces. Plaque causes the gums to become inflamed, as the immune system responds to the bacteria. Eventually, this can cause gum tissue to pull away from the teeth, forming bacteria-filled “pockets” under the gum surface. If left untreated, it can lead to more serious infection, and even tooth loss.

What should you do if your gums bleed regularly when brushing or flossing? The first step is to come in for a thorough examination. In combination with a regular oral exam (and possibly x-rays or other diagnostic tests), a simple (and painless) instrument called a periodontal probe can be used to determine how far any periodontal disease may have progressed. Armed with this information, we can determine the most effective way to fight the battle against gum disease.

Above all, don’t wait too long to come in for an exam! As Dr. Stork notes, bleeding gums are “a sign that things aren’t quite right.”  If you would like more information about bleeding gums, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bleeding Gums.” You can read the entire interview with Dr. Travis Stork in Dear Doctor magazine.


By Convery Dental Associates
August 09, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: bad breath  
10TipstoTameBadBreath

National Fresh Breath Day is celebrated in August, but who doesn’t want fresh breath every day? Everyone has bad breath once in a while, so here are some tips to fight it.

1. Step up your oral hygiene routine.
Good oral hygiene is the first line of defense against bad breath. Brush your teeth morning and night and floss daily to remove much of the tiny food debris and plaque (colonies of oral bacteria) that can cause bad breath.

2. Don’t neglect your tongue.
A coated tongue can be a source of bad breath, so brush your tongue as well as your teeth or use a tongue scraper, which can be purchased in the oral health aisle of your local pharmacy.

3. Clean around your braces.
If you have braces, use an interdental brush or a water flosser to free trapped food particles.

4. Pay attention to your oral appliances.
If you wear dentures, be sure to clean them thoroughly every day, and brush your gums and the inside of your mouth as well. Bridgework also needs special attention: Clean carefully around the bridge and under the false tooth, as food can get stuck there.

5. Tackle dry mouth.
Dry mouth, a major cause of bad breath, can result from numerous medications, salivary gland problems, or breathing through the mouth instead of the nose due to sinus problems, sleep apnea, or other conditions. If your mouth is chronically dry, chew sugarless gum to stimulate saliva production, or ask about an over-the-counter or prescription saliva substitute.

6. Avoid extreme dieting.
Weight loss diets that advocate a stringent reduction in carbohydrates can lead to “keto breath.” This foul-smelling breath happens when the body burns fat instead of glucose for fuel.

7. Quit smoking.
In addition to smelling like cigarettes, people who smoke have less—as well as lower quality—saliva, which contributes to bad breath and poor oral health. If you need help quitting, talk with us or call (800) QUIT-NOW.

8. Be aware that some foods and beverages can leave stinky breath.
These include garlic, onions, strong spices, coffee, alcohol, cheese, and canned fish.

9. Keep up with regular dental visits.
Professional dental cleanings are necessary to get rid of hardened plaque (tartar) that can’t be removed by your brushing and flossing routine at home. We also check for gum disease, another cause of bad breath.

10. See your doctor.
Certain medical conditions like acid reflux, diabetes, and respiratory infections can cause bad breath. If you have an untreated health condition, make an appointment with your medical doctor.

If you are concerned about bad breath, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing.”




Dr. Robert Antmann

Dr. Sandy Goldstein

Dr. Marty Jablow

Read more about our doctors

Questions or Comments?
We encourage you to contact us whenever you have an interest or concern about our services.